Courses Taught

I have been privileged with teaching a socially and intellectually diverse body of students in both introductory and advanced level courses. The following is a description of the selected courses I have taught in the past years.

Comparative Development/Poverty

Course Description:

This advanced undergraduate course (400-level) investigates the causes, consequences, and manifestations of poverty and development across the world. The course analyzes historical roots and prevailing scenarios of poverty and development in comparative perspectives, with special attention to the Global South, relying heavily on empirical examples and case materials, particularly but not only from South Asia (my place of origin).

Globalization and Justice

Course Description:

This advanced introductory (300-level) course offers a sociological introduction to globalization and (in)justice in comparative and historical context. While this course utilizes some important theoretical traditions, it relies on empirical examples and case materials. After discussing diverse theories of globalization and global justice, the course then focuses on topics such as the globalization of risk, environmental crises, and social mobilization.

Environment and Society

Course Description:

The course offers a sociological introduction to the causes and consequences of environmental crises we face today. The course largely takes a comparative and historical perspective. The course examines four central areas; therefore, it is divided into four parts: (1) the type, breadth, and consequences of environmental problems; (2) theoretical viewpoints on the causes and consequences of environmental problems; (3) environmental injustice and the human/social responses to environmental problems; and (4) alternative approaches for impending environmental crisis. Importantly, a central theme that is emphasized in this course is that the environmental issues we are facing now are also profoundly social justice issues.

Introduction to Sociology

Course Description:

In this introductory course, I familiarize the students with all the important and fundamental aspects of sociology. After completing this introductory course, students will exactly understand what it means when someone says, “Neither the life of an individual nor the history of a society can be understood without understanding both.” Essentially, students will learn to use the Sociological Imagination. As sociology examines how the invisible social forces of the world influence the way we think, experience, and act, it is undeniably worthy of study. For the same reason, sociological observations, as emphasized in the course, can range from simple to complex, including the interactions between people to the complex dynamics between nations or multinational corporations.

Sociological Theory

Course Description:

In this course, I focus on the intellectual roots and essential aspects of sociological theory, beginning with classical theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim and ending with extending the theoretical canon to some neglected figures, such as W.E.B. DuBois, Frantz Fanon, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Jane Adams. Students will learn how their works, albeit differently, underscore and analyze the constitutional logic and the elements of modern society—leaving a commendable legacy in the discipline of sociology. The course concludes with a few contemporary thinkers and critical discussions of globalization, postmodern conditions, and neoliberalism.

Social Stratification

Course Description:

The course critically examines the causes and consequences of social inequality across the world. After beginning with an introduction to fundamental concepts, the course brings key classical and contemporary approaches to social stratification, emphasizing issues related to social inequality in the age of neoliberal globalization. Then, the course moves toward discussing specific dimensions of social stratification, such as economic, social class, race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and global inequality. The course will help students develop a sociological understanding of social inequality and analytical and methodological competence to grasp issues related to stratification.

Social Movements

Course Description:

The key objective of this course is to introduce students to concepts, theories, and issues of local and global social movements. Questions that will be central in this course: Why do social movements occur? Who are the people who join the movement? How are movements organized? How far can movements be mobilized? And, how long do movements sustain, and why do movements decline? This advanced undergraduate course examines these questions via a range of examples, such as the civil rights movement, the feminist movement, and the gay/lesbian liberation movement, as well as movements contesting neoliberalism in the global South.